If someone you know has taken the opportunity to relocate to Australia, there is a good chance that they might appreciate some home comforts. Whether it’s a family member who is using Australia as a stop gap on their travels or a friend who has chosen to emigrate to the land down under, you might be nice enough to send a package full of goodies. However, with strict controls in place, it’s important to remember what you can and cannot send.

Image Credit

What items are prohibited?

There are many items that are not allowed to be sent to the country, such as perishable goods, plants and animal products. With the holidays coming up, sending a festive package is always a nice idea, but you should be aware of what you are unable to include. Decorations such as wreaths and mistletoe are prohibited, as are any products containing sand, seeds, raw nuts, fruit, vegetables and certain meats.

You can send Christmas cakes, chocolates and other confectionary, although by the time it arrives, it might not be quite as edible as it was when you sent it.

As a general rule, plants and flowers should not be sent due to the potential hazards. This includes dried flowers, potpourri, seeds and herbs. Fresh produce, such as fruit and vegetables, are also not allowed, along with meat, dairy products and animal products such as feathers or bones.

Image Credit

What if I’m not sure if an item is allowed?

When sending your parcel, it is important to fill in the postage declaration honestly to avoid it being held in quarantine on the receiving end. If you do accidentally include a prohibited item, it is up to the recipient to take the necessary steps to retrieve it before it is destroyed. Make sure to check any up-to-date lists of what you can and cannot send, or speak to your courier if you have any doubts. If you’re in Bracknell couriers such as www.uk-tdl.com may be able to offer further advice about your packages, how they should be packed and what can be included.

Needless to say, Reg Spiers’ parcel wouldn’t find its way into the country nowadays.

The list of banned items is quite extensive, but when you consider how much Australia has to protect, it is more than understandable.