One of the biggest milestones in any teenager’s life is when they get their driver’s license. It’s a sign of maturity, a new level of independence and it also marks the moment when they can finally start driving on their own. And while we’re sure that you want your son or daughter to be excited about all of the things that being able to drive signifies, we also know that something you want more is for them to be safe.

In the effort to help you provide them with the information on how to get back and forth to their destinations without experiencing any hurt, harm or danger, we wanted to provide you with the top five ways that teens tend to get distracted in the hopes that your child will not fall victim to them.

Their cell phone. For many of us, when we started driving, we didn’t have to worry about our cell phones distracting us because we didn’t own one. But now, mobile phones are so common that virtually every teenager has one. And being that they can not only call someone but text and surf the internet, it really is best that you encourage your teen to put their phone on silent until they get to where they need to go. Any call (or text) can wait in the meantime.

Driving Prevention Tips for Teens

Their friends. If along with your teen’s license you purchased them a car, this means that you have the right to establish certain rules. So, until you feel confident that your teen has semi-mastered the wheel, you may want to recommend that they drive alone. Spending a lot of time talking, laughing and looking at their friends in the backseat is another way for them to get lose focus, and it only takes a few seconds to miss a car in their path or to accidentally run off of the road.

Their music. Riding in the car listening to their favorite radio station is one thing. But if your teen has it turned up so loudly that it sounds like there is a live concert happening inside of their vehicle, that is a surefire way for them to miss the outside noise that is going around them (like a fire engine or ambulance, for instance). That’s why you should discuss with them what volume level is appropriate and what is not.

Their food. If you were to ask a car company about what you should tell your teen could prove to be a distraction for them, we’re willing to bet that one of the things they would say is that they shouldn’t eat while driving. Although it’s pretty common for just about all of us to stop by a drive-thru and snack on something while we’re on the road, it’s honestly not the smartest thing to do. Therefore, let them know that it really is a better idea that if they want to have a meal to go somewhere, park, eat and then leave the premises once they are done.

Their car. There are many people who have gotten into car accidents while adjusting something on their dashboard. For this reason, also let your teen know that it’s best to position their car seat, windows and lights before leaving the driveway. That will prevent them from multi-tasking as they’re moving about and help them to remain focused on the road.