The arts and crafts movement in Britain, came at a time when the economic and industrial landscape of Britain was changing hugely. The farms became factories and small towns increased in size and population density to provide work for the new factories that were springing up. Transport became faster with steam trains and canals moving goods around the country.

The founders of the arts and crafts movement disliked this new Britain and wanted the country to go back to the simpler ways of life before the huge industrialisation. It gained popularity around 1840 and continued to be popular throughout the Victorian era, even moving across the Atlantic to America.

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The styles within the movement were varied, but the main influences were the images of nature and some of the medieval and gothic artwork of that period. The Red House of William Morris and Phillip Webb displays this gothic architectural style on the roof of the house whereas the simple brickwork deliberately shows a simple home, rejecting the elaborate and gaudy decoration in some of the London homes. Built by Webb and Morris, the interior is decorated with murals in the arts and crafts style. The house also has very large servants’ quarters, a nod to the Socialist ideals of Morris.

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Many artists involved in the arts and crafts movement aspired to a simpler and more traditional way of life, which meant that there are many homes around the rural locations such as the Cotswolds, the Lake District and Cornwall, and you can find relics from those days around these parts even now, and coins from the era from coin dealers UK .